May 11th, 2017| Albany, NY

Governor Cuomo Announces More Than $62 Million to Upgrade Local Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems Across New York State

Grants and Low-Cost Financing Will Enhance Water Quality in Communities Statewide

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation Board of Directors approved more than $62 million in grants, interest-free loans, and low-cost loans to support vital drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects across New York State. This funding will provide much-needed assistance for drinking water and wastewater projects in communities statewide. Today’s Board approval includes over $9 million in grants awarded in the second round of funding from the 2015 Water Infrastructure Improvement Act.

"These projects are critical to helping communities upgrade their aging water infrastructure, which builds the foundation for future growth and vitality," Governor Cuomo said. "This continued investment in drinking and wastewater systems will improve water quality in cities across the state and bring us closer to a stronger, healthier New York for all."

Under the Water Infrastructure Improvement Act, $225 million in grant has leveraged over $1 billion in total project costs for over 120 projects in New York State. These grants resulted in over $629 million in taxpayer savings.

The Governor also recently announced that applications are available for $255 million in funding for vital drinking water and wastewater infrastructure upgrades as part of the $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act of 2017. $225 million is available through the Water Infrastructure Improvement Act and $30 million is available for the new Intermunicipal Water Infrastructure Grants Program. For more information on the Water Infrastructure Improvement Act and IMG grant programs, as well as an application, visit www.efc.ny.gov/NYSWaterGrants.

Environmental Facilities Corporation President and CEO Sabrina M. Ty said, "Strengthening our water systems is critical for improving the quality of life for communities across the state. The Water Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2017 and the new Intermunicipal Water Infrastructure Grants Program will allow EFC to provide financial assistance to more communities than ever before."

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner and Environmental Facilities Corporation Chair Basil Seggos said, "Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, New York has become a national leader making record investments to ensure our communities have access to clean drinking water and updated wastewater infrastructure. This funding will help protect vital drinking water, make necessary updates to wastewater infrastructure, support the state’s economy, and help strengthen these communities."

Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said, "Investing in water infrastructure protects the health of millions of New Yorkers who rely upon these systems for clean drinking water. Governor Cuomo’s $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act and his continued investment in water systems through the Environmental Facilities Corporation will help ensure that New York’s water remains safe to drink, while creating a national model for the protection of water."

The grants approved today, along with the interest-free and low-interest loans provided by EFC allow municipalities to finance these projects at a significantly lower rate than financing on their own.

The projects approved at the May 11 meeting include:

Capital Region

  • Village of Corinth (Saratoga County) – $24.2 million, including a $5 million WIIA 2015 grant and a $16.5 million zero-interest loan to finance costs associated with the planning, design and construction of a new Wastewater Treatment Plant, Sanitary Sewer replacement and Pump Station replacement for the Village.
  • City of Watervliet (Albany County) – A $2.3 million WIIA 2015 grant for the identification and replacement of several sections of the raw water transmission main and sections of the finished water distribution main and appurtenances. This project will also upgrade the City’s water storage tank and will make improvements to an existing emergency interconnection with the Village of Menands.

Long Island

  • Village of Ocean Beach (Suffolk County) – $3.7 million, including a $1.9 million zero-interest loan and a $1.2 million low-interest loan for the construction of a new water supply well to serve as a redundant water source for the Village.

Mid-Hudson

  • Village of Woodridge (Sullivan County) – $1.8 million, including a $1.6 million zero interest loan to finance the costs associated with the planning, design and construction of measures to make the Village sanitary sewer system more resilient to future storm events.

Mohawk Valley

  • Town of Verona (Oneida Country) – $6.5 million, including a $5.3 million low-interest loan to finance the costs associated with the planning, design and construction of the Verona Sewer District.

North Country

  • Town of Champlain (Clinton Country) – $13.9 million, including a $1 million WIIA 2015 grant, a $2 million Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund grant, and a $10.9 million zero-interest loan to finance the costs of the installation of new storage tanks and improvements to the distribution system within the Town and Village of Champlain. The Village water treatment system will also be upgraded to include water softening equipment.

Southern Tier

  • Village of Delhi (Delaware County) – $2.3 million, including a $1.4 million WIIA 2015 grant and a $911,835 low-interest loan for the development of a new well and treatment facility to provide a redundant water source for the Village, installation of a new water main to connect the new well to the existing distribution system, and replacement of an aged, undersized distribution main in the Village.
  • Village of Greene (Chenango Country) – $7.7 million, including a $1.7 million Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund grant, and a $5.9 million zero-interest loan to finance the costs associated with the planning, design and construction of measures to make the Village sanitary sewer system more resilient to future storm events.

New York State leads the nation with the largest annual investment in water-quality infrastructure of any state. Since 2011, EFC has provided more than $11.5 billion in subsidized loans, grants and loan re-financings to local governments.

 

May 10th, 2017| Albany, NY

New York State Announces $3 Million Pilot Program to Help Municipalities Improve Sewer System Operations

10 Municipalities Selected to Work with Engineering Firm to Better Manage Sewer Systems At No Cost

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos and Environmental Facilities Corporation (EFC) President and CEO Sabrina M. Ty announced today that 10 municipalities have been selected to participate in a new $3 million pilot program. In the pilot, an engineering firm will work with each municipality free of charge to develop asset management planning to improve operations, management, and maintenance of wastewater treatment plants and sewage collection and conveyance systems.

"Governor Cuomo continues to invest in updating and upgrading New York's water infrastructure to keep our communities healthy and economically vibrant. This pilot program is an example of the depth of the state's investment. Municipalities will receive expert advice and assistance at no cost, allowing them to better manage resources and serve communities," said DEC Commissioner Seggos. "A municipal sewage system that is properly functioning, well-maintained, and fiscally sustainable for the long-term will protect public health and safety, as well as the environment."

"Under Governor Cuomo's leadership, the State continues to expand the tools and financial assistance available to municipalities to address their water infrastructure needs," said Sabrina M. Ty, EFC President and CEO. "This new pilot program will assist municipalities to more efficiently manage their existing systems while assessing future needs."

Ten communities were selected to participate in the three-year pilot Municipal Sewage System Asset Management Program. The municipalities will work with DEC, EFC, and the engineering firm Barton & Loguidice (B&L) to develop or enhance their municipal asset management plans. During the pilot, the municipalities will implement their plans and provide feedback to DEC and EFC.

Municipality  Facility Name
 Town of Bethlehem Dinmore Road Wastewater Treatment Plant
Village of Dolgeville Dolgeville Wastewater Treatment Facility
Washington County Sewer District #2 Washington County Sewer District #2
 Village of Greenport Greenport Wastewater Treatment Plant
Village of Honeoye Falls Village of Honeoye Falls Wastewater Treatment Plan
Town of Carmel Carmel Sewer District (CSD) 4,5,6 and 7
Onondaga County Department of Water Environmental Protection (OCDWEP) Oak Orchard Wastewater Treatment Plant
Village of Vernon Village of Vernon Wastewater Treatment Plant
Village of Westfield Village of Westfield Water Pollution Control Facility
City of Yonkers Sanitary Sewer System

Systems improvements, or 'asset management,' help wastewater treatment facilities operate facilities more efficiently by saving resources. Asset management focuses on managing the critical, physical components (assets) of a wastewater system (e.g., treatment facilities, pipes, tanks and pumps) with the goal of minimizing the overall costs of owning and operating these assets while delivering quality services to customers and protecting public health and the environment.

Key aspects of asset management include asset inventories, informed decision-making, and long-term funding strategies. Asset management planning is also a useful approach to enhancing storm resiliency and water and energy efficiency in clean water infrastructure systems.

DEC solicited volunteers for the pilot program in late 2015. More than 80 municipalities applied to participate. For the pilot, DEC chose those 10 that represent a variety of wastewater systems in order to learn how asset management works in different places around the state.

The pilot program will use $3 million for the project.

DEC will use the information gathered during the pilot program to finalize its Asset Management Program guidance. The guidance will then be released for public comment before finalization.

For additional information about asset management and more information about the pilot program, visit DEC's website.




May 15, 2017

Watervliet Receives Grant for Water Infrastructure

WATERVLIET, N.Y. >> Watervliet officials are pleased to announce that the city has officially been awarded $2.3 million drinking water grant and that work for the project can start soon.

In 2015, the city submitted an application for a drinking water grant to the Environmental Facilities Corporation and the Department of Health. In August of 2016, the city was notified that they were awarded $2,262,384 for a project with a total cost of $3,770,640. Mayor Michael Manning said the city financed the roughly $1.5 million balance for the total cost of the project.

The project includes $256,573 in transmission main work to find and fix any possible leaks and provide better access to the transmission main which runs from the reservoir in Guilderland to the Filter Plant on route 155 in Latham. Another $387,589 is earmarked for rehabilitation of the standpipe water tower on the North West corner of the city limits near highland club and this includes the cleaning out of the tower and repainting as well as other upgrades.

City officials said the remaining funds available will then go towards upgrading and updating water mains throughout the city, with a total of 12 water mains at 11,400 linear feet, and that includes 10 valves and an emergency interconnection between the city and the Village of Menands.

City officials said that the main section of water main work will be done at 3rd Avenue on Route 32 from 4th Street north to Broadway and now that the city officially received the awarded funds, work on the project is now expected to begin sometime this month.

“Being a small city there’s a lot of area of roads that are going to be dug up, so we broke it into two phases over the next two years,” said Jeremy Smith, acting city general manager. “ Phase one has been bid and awarded, Gallo Construction will be beginning work somewhere next week, whether it’s just mobilizing or actually digging, but they’re going to be starting very soon, so this will finally begin now that it has been approved.”

Smith said that city officials already have an idea as to where the work will begin for this project.

“We separated them somewhat strategically and because of some other work that we have going on, so they are kind of scattered that way it basically takes one section of the city at a time and allows for detour routes, although we won’t be closing roads,” explained Smith.

Smith said that work is scheduled to start with two sections at the South East corner of the city, First Street and Eighth Avenue,” said Smith, “and then it will move to Sixth Street between Broadway and Second Avenue.”

After starting with those streets first, crew workers will then continue working on other roads from this month until October. Some other roads being worked on this year include 3rd Avenue between 13th and 15th Streets; 13th Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenue; 2nd Avenue from 13th Street South;1st Street from 8th to 7th, 8th Avenue from 1st to 2nd Streets; 6th Street between Broadway and 2nd Avenue; 1stAvenue from 13th Street South; and 8th Avenue from 25th Street North.

Additional roads will be done as part of this project during the second phase, which will happen between April 2018 and October 2018.

The City Council recently also approved an agreement with Weston & Sampson of Rensselaer for engineering services in connection with this grant project.

“We recognized that this money was available a few years back and we applied for it, this is work in our water infrastructure that is necessary and we viewed it as work that needed to be done over the next five years,” said Smith. “Regardless of whether we received this grant or not, this work was going to have to be done and we were going to have to spend these funds, so receiving grant funding of nearly $2.3 million saves the taxpayers money on this in the long term and the reason that we’re able to do this is because of efficient and proper planning by the water department, the city administration and our elected officials.”

May 12, 2017

$10M in Sate Funds to Aid Delhi, Greene Water Projects

The village of Delhi and the village of Greene will receive access to millions of dollars as a result of the approval of statewide grants by the New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation Board of Directors, according to a media release Thursday.

The board approved more than $62 million in grants, interest-free loans, and low-cost loans to support drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects across New York state. The board approval includes more than $9 million in grants awarded in the second round of funding from the 2015 Water Infrastructure Improvement Act.

The village of Delhi in Delaware County will receive $2.3 million, including a $1.4 million WIIA 2015 grant and a $911,835 low-interest loan for the development of a new well and treatment facility to provide a redundant water source for the village, installation of a water main to connect the new well to the existing distribution system, and replacement of an aged, undersized distribution main in the village.

The village of Greene in Chenango County will get $7.7 million, including a $1.7 million Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund grant, and a $5.9 million zero-interest loan to finance the costs associated with the planning, design and construction of measures to make the village sanitary sewer system more resilient to future storm events.

"These projects are critical to helping communities upgrade their aging water infrastructure, which builds the foundation for future growth and vitality," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in the release. "This continued investment in drinking and wastewater systems will improve water quality in cities across the state and bring us closer to a stronger, healthier New York for all."

Under the WIIA, $225 million in grants has leveraged more than $1 billion in total project costs for more than 120 projects in New York state. the release said, with the grants resulting in more than $629 million in taxpayer savings.

May 11, 2017

Greenport Village Chosen to Receive State Funds for Sewer System Improvements

The Greenport Village wastewater treatment plant has been selected to participate in a $3 million pilot program to help municipalities improve sewer systems operations at no cost.

The program is run by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Environmental Facilities Corporation and provides engineers to help develop asset management planning and improve operations and maintenance of wastewater.

“Municipalities will receive expert advice and assistance at no cost, allowing them to better manage resources and serve communities,” said DEC commissioner Basil Seggos.

Greenport Village trustee Julia Robins was happy with the news, pointing out that any help in modernizing the village’s infrastructure is always welcome. 

“They will help us develop a computerized mechanical maintenance program for our wastewater treatment plant and in the first year we’ll provide them with data, which they’ll use to develop a computerized system for us. Then for the next couple of years we’ll be providing them with information from that system to see if it’s working.”

Since Greenport is only a small municipality, the allocated funds from the grant will probably amount to only a few thousand dollars in services, she said. “But any amount for our infrastructure is very important and I think it’s a great thing to modernize our system.”

The DEC solicited volunteers for the pilot program in late 2015 and more than 80 municipalities applied to participate.  Greenport Village was the only municipality on Long Island chosen for the program.